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U.S.: CEO: Companies Need To Use More Commercial Tech in Weapons

Jun. 11, 2014 By MARCUS WEISGERBER

http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140611/DEFREG02/306110027/CEO-Companies-Need-Use-More-Commercial-Tech-Weapons?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|World%20News|p

WASHINGTON — Global defense companies need to import and adapt more commercial technology into military weapons and systems of the future, a former US deputy defense secretary turned industry CEO said Wednesday.

The Pentagon is more often using these types of technologies, such as 3-D printing and IT systems, allowing troops to use smartphones to view real-time reconnaissance information.

“The model was to develop things internally and then put them out [commercially],” said Bill Lynn, CEO of Finmeccanica North America and a former deputy defense secretary under Robert Gates and Leon Panetta.

“We still need to do that in some cases, but in many more cases we’re going to have to pull commercial technologies in and militarize them and operationalize them,” he said Wednesday at a Center for a New American Security (CNAS) conference.

Lynn and retired Adm. James Stavridis, now dean of Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, presented a just-completed CNAS report on the future of the global defense industry.

There is more commercial technology in defense than there has been in past decades, Lynn said. In the past five years, the commercial content in defense acquisitions has risen from about 10 percent to about 30 percent, he said.

“To maintain our technological edge, what you’re going to have to see is the defense sector is going to have to become more an importer [of commercial technology] than we have in the past,” Lynn said. “The balance has been more toward export.”

Those exports have included GPS and the Internet. Some capabilities that will shape the future include cyber, unmanned, biology and nano technologies, Lynn said.

But, the Defense Department needs to lower the barriers of entry to allow more commercial technology into defense acquisitions, Lynn said.

That said, the defense industry is moving too slowly to adjust to trends in technology and security, Lynn and Stavridis said in the CNAS report.

Many defense companies have been investing less in research-and-development programs, instead executing a short-term strategy of moving cash back to shareholders, Lynn said. That puts the industry at risk, he said.

Some companies are starting to raise research-and-development investment levels, Lynn noted.

Marillyn Hewson, Lockheed Martin’s chairman, CEO and president, said Monday that her firm plans to boost its internal research-and-development spending by more than $30 million this year.

But despite the increase, the company’s investment in these types of projects is still tens of millions of dollars less than it was 15 years ago. ■

Email: mweisgerber@defensenews.com.

***Note from Anna: Don’t you wish that the large, corrupt, self-serving corporations of America (and the politicians in the U.S. government on their knees serving them) could find better things to do than spending billions of taxpayer dollars annually creating and maintaining endless wars? I know I do.

It would be fantastic if they could start learning to create viable, supportive, productive jobs and exportable products that don’t result in thousands of soldiers, innocent American civilians, and overseas civilian citizens getting injured and murdered on a daily basis.

Military defense is critical and necessary when used in it’s proper place. The constitution was not created to solely engage in endless wars and skirmishes that bankrupt, sicken, murder, and weaken millions of citizens while weakening the American economic and social infrastructures.

WARSAW, Poland  — “President Barack Obama called on Congress Tuesday to back a $1 billion effort to boost the U.S. military presence across Europe, as he sought to ease anxiety among NATO allies who are wary of Russia’s threatening moves in Ukraine.”

http://www.military.com/daily-news/2014/06/03/obama-asks-for-1b-to-boost-us-military-in-europe.html?comp=7000023467962&rank=2

From the American Military News May 19, 2014

“…The 2015 Budget request reflects a 35.2% increase in discretionary budget since 2009 with a 3.0% increase over 2014 request.For that money, the department is coming up with innovative methods to keep Congress unaware of how long veterans have to wait to be seen.In addition, the Washington Free Beacon reports that during the time from 2009 to the present, the VA has spent about $500 million on office furniture:

The VA has spent a total of $489 million to upgrade conference rooms, buy draperies, and purchase new office furniture during the past four-and-a-half years.”

The 2015 Budget request reflects a 35.2% increase in discretionary budget since 2009 with a 3.0% increase over 2014 request.For that money, the department is coming up with innovative methods to keep Congress unaware of how long veterans have to wait to be seen.In addition, the Washington Free Beacon reports that during the time from 2009 to the present, the VA has spent about $500 million on office furniture:

The VA has spent a total of $489 million to upgrade conference rooms, buy draperies, and purchase new office furniture during the past four-and-a-half years.

- See more at: http://americanmilitarynews.com/2014/05/va-budget-increases-wont-believe-theyre-money/#sthash.BzFlHSSZ.dpuf

 The 2015 Budget request reflects a 35.2% increase in discretionary budget since 2009 with a 3.0% increase over 2014 request.For that money, the department is coming up with innovative methods to keep Congress unaware of how long veterans have to wait to be seen.In addition, the Washington Free Beacon reports that during the time from 2009 to the present, the VA has spent about $500 million on office furniture:

The VA has spent a total of $489 million to upgrade conference rooms, buy draperies, and purchase new office furniture during the past four-and-a-half years.

- See more at: http://americanmilitarynews.com/2014/05/va-budget-increases-wont-believe-theyre-money/#sthash.BzFlHSSZ.dpuf

 The 2015 Budget request reflects a 35.2% increase in discretionary budget since 2009 with a 3.0% increase over 2014 request.For that money, the department is coming up with innovative methods to keep Congress unaware of how long veterans have to wait to be seen.In addition, the Washington Free Beacon reports that during the time from 2009 to the present, the VA has spent about $500 million on office furniture:

The VA has spent a total of $489 million to upgrade conference rooms, buy draperies, and purchase new office furniture during the past four-and-a-half years.

- See more at: http://americanmilitarynews.com/2014/05/va-budget-increases-wont-believe-theyre-money/#sthash.BzFlHSSZ.dpuf

http://americanmilitarynews.com/2014/05/va-budget-increases-wont-believe-theyre-money/

U.S.: CIA Joins Social Media, is Immediately Trolled

http://rt.com/usa/164336-cia-joins-social-media-2014/

Though the US Central Intelligence Agency may use Facebook, Twitter, and the like to keep tabs on targets of interest, the spy agency has only now officially joined social media–a move hastened by an imposter who was using the agency’s name online.

The agency’s first tweet, which earned the CIA nearly 200,000 Twitter followers in just a few hours, was the appropriately sarcastic, “We can neither confirm nor deny that this is our first tweet.” There were already 40,000 followers after just a single hour online, with the agency’s debut on Facebook sparking a similar conversation on that platform.

By expanding to these platforms, CIA will be able to more directly engage with the public and provide information on the CIA’s mission, history, and other developments,” CIA Director John Brennan said in a press release Friday. “We have important insights to share, and we want to make sure that unclassified information about the agency is more accessible to the American public that we serve, consistent with our national security mission.”

The CIA admitted as far back as 2011 that its agents and employees regularly scan social media to spy on intelligence targets. It already had multiple accounts on Flickr and YouTube, but only debuted on Twitter Friday because it had spent months lobbying Twitter to stop someone else who was already using the @CIA handle.

There was someone out there impersonating CIA via Twitter,” spokesperson K. Jordan Caldwell told NBC. “Earlier this year, CIA filed an impersonation complaint with Twitter and they secured the @CIA account for us, which is routine for government agencies. This has been a lengthy process. It’s been in the works for a long time.”

The poser wasn’t a member of the Syrian Electronic Army, or even a veteran of the agency’s “enhanced interrogation” techniques, but the Cleveland Institute of Art, which was cursed with the same abbreviation as one of the most powerful cloak and dagger agencies in the world.

We just deleted that one because it was kind of confusing,” Jessica Moore, the institute’s web manager, told the Wall Street Journal. “Some people would mention us in their tweets and they were clearly thinking they were talking with the ‘real CIA,’ the Central Intelligence Agency.”

If the CIA is used to infiltrating foreign governments and aiding assassinations, though, it was still unprepared for Twitter trolling. Tweets immediately began pouring into the agency’s timeline from all over the world. Whether it be journalists, comedians, companies, or conspiracy theorists, seemingly all of Twitter felt compelled to make a joke that had been made dozens of times before.

Certainly the most effective trolling so far has come from the New York Review of Books, which launched an assault on the CIA’s Twitter feed complete with the torture methods used by the CIA and the date each incident occurred.

Each of the flurry of tweets included a link to the 2009 NY Review of Boks article titled “US Torture. Voices from the Black Sites,” which “reveals for the first time the contents of a confidential Red Cross report about the CIA’s secret offshore prisons.” The link was unavailable for much of the afternoon Friday, most likely because the site in question was overwhelmed with the sudden amount of traffic that came from the hundreds of retweets and favorites.

Along with compelling the Cleveland Institute of Art to give up its Twitter moniker, the CIA’s debut on Twitter is also timely because it comes as a number of US government agencies have increasingly relied on social media to communicate with the public. The trend began a year ago after the Edward Snowden leak, when the National Security Agency sought to shift the conversation with its own Twitter account.

Other US government departments have attempted to use social media not only to get out their message, but at times to actively combat America’s enemies in sometimes bizarre online spats,” explained Lee Ferran of ABC News. “The State Department’s Think Again Turn Away Twitter account, for instance, directly engages in arguments with pro-jihadi computer users. Terrorist groups, like the Taliban and the Al-Qaeda-allied group Al-Shabab in Somalia, already have a robust social media presence, which they use to spread their own propaganda.”

U.S. Vodafone Exposes Secret Worldwide Network of Government Wiretaps

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/06/05/vodafone-exposes-secret-worldwide-network-of-government-wiretaps/

By Juliette Garside, The Guardian

Wires allow agencies to listen to or record live conversations, in what privacy campaigners are calling a ‘nightmare scenario’

Vodafone, one of the world’s largest mobile phone groups, has revealed the existence of secret wires that allow government agencies to listen to all conversations on its networks, saying they are widely used in some of the 29 countries in which it operates in Europe and beyond.

The company has broken its silence on government surveillance in order to push back against the increasingly widespread use of phone and broadband networks to spy on citizens, and will publish its first Law Enforcement Disclosure Report on Friday. At 40,000 words, it is the most comprehensive survey yet of how governments monitor the conversations and whereabouts of their people.

The company said wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer. Privacy campaigners said the revelations were a “nightmare scenario” that confirmed their worst fears on the extent of snooping.

In Albania, Egypt, Hungary, India, Malta, Qatar, Romania, South Africa and Turkey, it is unlawful to disclose any information related to wiretapping or interception of the content of phone calls and messages including whether such capabilities exist.

“For governments to access phone calls at the flick of a switch is unprecedented and terrifying,” said the Liberty director, Shami Chakrabarti. “[Edward] Snowden revealed the internet was already treated as fair game. Bluster that all is well is wearing pretty thin – our analogue laws need a digital overhaul.”

In about six of the countries in which Vodafone operates, the law either obliges telecoms operators to install direct access pipes, or allows governments to do so. The company, which owns mobile and fixed broadband networks, including the former Cable & Wireless business, has not named the countries involved because certain regimes could retaliate by imprisoning its staff.

Direct-access systems do not require warrants, and companies have no information about the identity or the number of customers targeted. Mass surveillance can happen on any telecoms network without agencies having to justify their intrusion to the companies involved.

Industry sources say that in some cases, the direct-access wire, or pipe, is essentially equipment in a locked room in a network’s central data centre or in one of its local exchanges or “switches”.

The staff working in that room can be employed by the telecoms firm, but have state security clearance and are usually unable to discuss any aspect of their work with the rest of the company. Vodafone says it requires all employees to follow its code of conduct, but secrecy means that it cannot always verify that they do so.

Government agencies can also intercept traffic on its way into a data centre, combing through conversations before routing them on to the operator.

“These are the nightmare scenarios that we were imagining,” said Gus Hosein, executive director of Privacy International, which has brought legal action against the British government over mass surveillance.

“I never thought the telcos [telecommunications companies] would be so complicit. It’s a brave step by Vodafone and hopefully the other telcos will become more brave with disclosure, but what we need is for them to be braver about fighting back against the illegal requests and the laws themselves.”

Vodafone’s group privacy officer, Stephen Deadman, said: “These pipes exist, the direct access model exists.

“We are making a call to end direct access as a means of government agencies obtaining people’s communication data. Without an official warrant, there is no external visibility. If we receive a demand we can push back against the agency. The fact that a government has to issue a piece of paper is an important constraint on how powers are used.”

Vodafone is calling for all direct-access pipes to be disconnected, and for the laws that make them legal to be amended. It says governments should “discourage agencies and authorities from seeking direct access to an operator’s communications infrastructure without a lawful mandate”.

All states should publish annual data on the number of warrants issued, the company argues. There are two types – those for the content of calls and messages, and those for the metadata, which can cover the location of a target’s device, the times and dates of communications, and the people with whom they communicated.

For brevity, the Guardian has also used the term metadata to cover warrants for customer information such as name and address. The information published in our table covers 2013 or the most recent year available. A single warrant can target hundreds of individuals and devices, and several warrants can target just one individual. Governments count warrants in different ways and New Zealand, for example, excludes those concerning national security. While software companies like Apple and Microsoft have jumped to publish the number of warrants they receive since the activities of America’s NSA and Britain’s GCHQ came to light, telecoms companies, which need government licences to operate, have been slower to respond.

In America, Verizon and AT&T have published data, but only on their domestic operations. Deutsche Telekom in Germany and Telstra in Australia have also broken ground at home. Vodafone is the first to produce a global survey.

It shows that Malta is one of the most spied on nations in Europe. The former British protectorate has a tiny population of 420,000, but last year Vodafone alone processed 3,773 requests for metadata.

In Italy, where the mafia’s presence requires a high level of police intrusion, Vodafone received 606,000 metadata requests, more than any other country in which it runs networks. The number of warrants across all operators is potentially many times that number, but the government does not publish a national figure for metadata.

Italy’s parliament does disclose content warrants, however, and it issued 141,000 in 2012, compared with just 2,760 in the United Kingdom. In contrast to the UK, terrorism concerns mean Ireland does not allow any information on the number of content warrants to be made public.

Spain, which has suffered terrorist strikes from Islamists and Basque separatists, allowed Vodafone to disclose that it had received over 24,000 content warrants. Agencies in the Czech Republic made nearly 8,000 content requests from the network. After Italy, the Czech Republic is the biggest user of metadata, issuing 196,000 warrants nationally in the most recent year for which information has been published. Tanzania, one of several African countries in which Vodafone operates, made 99,000 metadata requests from the company.

Peter Micek, policy counsel at the campaign group Access, said: “In a sector that has historically been quiet about how it facilitates government access to user data, Vodafone has for the first time shone a bright light on the challenges of a global telecom giant, giving users a greater understanding of the demands governments make of telcos. Vodafone’s report also highlights how few governments issue any transparency reports, with little to no information about the number of wiretaps, cell site tower dumps, and other invasive surveillance practices.”

On the question of whether the UK uses direct-access pipes, Vodafone’s Deadman said such a system would be illegal because Britain did not permit agencies to obtain information without a warrant. The law does, however, allow indiscriminate collection of information on an unidentified number of targets. “We need to debate how we are balancing the needs of law enforcement with the fundamental rights and freedoms of the citizens. The ideal is we get a much more informed debate going, and we do all of that without putting our colleagues in danger.”

Snowden, the National Security Agency whistleblower, joined Google, Reddit, Mozilla and other tech firms and privacy groups on Thursday to call for a strengthening of privacy rights online in a “Reset the net” campaign.

Twelve months after revelations about the scale of the US government’s surveillance programs were first published in the Guardian and the Washington Post, Snowden said: “One year ago, we learned that the internet is under surveillance, and our activities are being monitored to create permanent records of our private lives – no matter how innocent or ordinary those lives might be. Today, we can begin the work of effectively shutting down the collection of our online communications, even if the U.S. Congress fails to do the same.”

 

****Note from Anna: Pay attention people. A lot of people in the marijuana industry, and those who help them, will probably get raided and go to jail, very soon, because of this exact situation.