Arizona Facing New Medical Marijuana Legal Challenge

Activism, Addiction, Administrative Procedures Act, Affordable Care Act, Alcohol industry, Anti-corruption, Arizona, Banking laws, Banks, Big pharma, Cannabidiol, Cannabis, CBD, Charlotte'sWeb, Cheap weed, Choctaw Nation, Class action civil lawsuit, Compassionate care, Compassionate use, Corruption, Cowboy Indian Alliance, DEA, Department of Agriculture, Department of Revenue, Dept. of Treasury, Drug War, Economy, Elder abuse, End oflife, Eric Holder, Fraud, Government spending, Governor Jan Brewer, Growing, Head trauma, HIV, Inhaled Cannabis, Invasion of privacy, IRS, Job creation, Jobs, Kingpin Statute, Law, Legal Activist Working Group, Marijuana, Marijuana industry, Marijuana news, Medicaid, Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, Medical, Medical Marijuana, Medicare, Medicine, National Cannabis Industry Association, Native Indigenous, Native Tribal, New legislation, Obamacare, Patient abuse, Police, Politics, Poverty, Premeditated murder, Public Citizen watchdog group, Recall, Recession, RICO, Spiritual Use, Tax havens, Taxes, Total Legalization, Treason, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, U.S. Court of Appeals, U.S. Patent: 6630507 Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants, U.S. Treasury, Uncategorized, United States, Universal Health Coverage, Veteran abuse, Veterans, Voting, Weed for Votes

http://azdailysun.com/news/local/state-and-regional/state-facing-new-medical-marijuana-legal-challenge/article_57453c0c-3005-11e4-b6c3-0019bb2963f4.html
PHOENIX — State health officials are facing a new legal challenge over a provision in the voter-approved Medical Marijuana Act that bars those who live within 25 miles of a dispensary from growing their own plants.

The lawsuit filed in Maricopa County Superior Court contends that giving some the right to grow but not to others is a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

http://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/equal_protection

Billy B. Hayes, who is not at attorney but filed the legal papers on behalf of himself and others, also contends the system gives dispensary operators a monopoly in violation of state constitutional provisions.

Hayes, a resident of El Mirage, wants Judge Arthur Anderson to rule that all of the more than 50,000 medical marijuana patients in Arizona are eligible to grow their own plants without fear of prosecution. And recognizing the case could take months, if not longer, Hayes is asking Anderson to block state health officials from enforcing the no-grow provisions while the lawsuit is proceeding.

The 2010 voter-approved Arizona Medical Marijuana Act allows those with specified medical conditions and a doctor’s recommendation to obtain up to 2 1/2 ounces of the drug every two weeks. And the law required the state to set up a system of privately run but state regulated dispensaries to sell the drug.

But the law also says those not within 25 miles could grow up to 12 plants of their own. Initially, that meant all marijuana patients, as there were no dispensaries when the law was approved. But state health officials, in renewing the annual permits for users, have rescinded their growing privileges when a dispensary opened nearby.

Health Director Will Humble acknowledged the law does create a disparity between those who can continue to grow their own drugs and those forced to purchase what they need from a dispensary. But he said the argument is not with him or his department, but with the people who crafted the 2010 initiative — and the voters who decided they wanted a restrictive system limiting use for medical purposes.

“The voters were told that this is a dispensary-based system that has inventory controls to prevent diversion of marijuana to non-cardholders,” he said. “That the program we delivered.”

Humble said this lawsuit seeks to undermine that with more of a free-for-all approach.

“One of the fundamental things that you lose in that kind of a system are the inventory controls that prevent diversion of marijuana to non-cardholders,” he said.

“When somebody’s growing 12 of their own plants in their own house, they could share it with anybody, not legally,” Humble continued. “But for all practical purposes, the inventory controls are lost.’

Humble said he’s not a lawyer and cannot address the legal questions being raised.

“But I can tell you we’re going to go toe-to-toe with the plaintiffs on this case and defend the law that the voters approved,” he said.

This is not the first challenge to the 25-mile restriction.

Last year Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Katherine Cooper rejected arguments by two men that the limit on growing marijuana violated a state constitutional provision which guarantees patients the right to decide their own health care. She also said nothing in the law forces them into any compulsory program.

But Cooper may have provided the roadmap for this lawsuit.

“The 25-mile provision does appear to create two groups of Arizona Medical Marijuana Act participants based on residence,” she wrote. But Cooper said the two men never raised that issue and she would not rule “in a vacuum as to its validity.”

No date has been set for a hearing.

 

***Note from Anna: Arizona voters you have been flat-out betrayed. Don’t get mad, get even. Vote out the traitors.

Pot Legalization In Uruguay Is Going Forward In A Big Way

Uncategorized

http://www.businessinsider.com/pot-legalization-in-uruguay-is-going-forward-in-a-big-way-2014-8

Copyright (2014) AFP. All rights reserved. From Business Insider  Aug. 29, 2014

marijuana

AFP

Uruguay sees it as an alternative to the “war on drugs.”

A total of 22 companies have submitted bids to supply marijuana under a law making Uruguay the first country to legalize production, sale and distribution of the drug, the government said Thursday.

Eight of them are Uruguayan, 10 foreign and the rest are joint ventures, said the newly created Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis.

Their product will be sold in pharmacies under the groundbreaking law approved in December.

The law’s mastermind, former leftist guerrilla President Jose Mujica, says it is a way to circumvent traffickers and stop wasting resources in fighting them.

Heavily criticized by the United Nations’ International Narcotics Control Board, Uruguay’s marijuana experiment is being closely followed by countries eager to find an alternative to the expensive and violent “war on drugs” spearheaded by the United States.

The Uruguayan government now has 15 days to choose up to five of the bidding companies.

They will receive a license for up to five years to produce up to two metric tons of pot per year for sale in pharmacies.

The marijuana will be grown on government-owned land in southwest San Jose department.

The law passed in December made this traditionally conservative and Catholic country the first in the world in which the government will regulate production, sale and distribution of marijuana.

The law also allows people to grow their own pot if they register with the government. That process began Wednesday and so far 54 people have signed up.

Yet another way for people to get pot is to join a club that distributes it. These associations are to start registration is about 10 days.

The sale of marijuana in pharmacies is scheduled to begin early next year.

97th Annual Arizona Tax Conference October 8-10, 2014 in Tucson

Arizona, Banking laws, Banks, DEA, Department of Revenue, Dept. of Treasury, Economy, Education, Farming, Growing, Hemp, IRS, Job creation, Jobs, Land Rights, Law, Legal Activist Working Group, Marijuana, Marijuana industry, Marijuana news, Medical, Medical Marijuana, Medicare, Medicine, National Cannabis Industry Association, Native Indigenous, Native Tribal, New legislation, Obamacare, Police, Politics, Public Citizen watchdog group, Recession, RICO, Tax havens, Taxes, U.S. Patent: 6630507 Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants, U.S. Treasury, Uncategorized, United States, Universal Health Coverage, Veterans, Voting

October 8-10, 2014
JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort
Tucson AZ

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e9mp5jpea43919ec&llr=fljn4vdab

Co-sponsored by the Arizona Department of Revenue and the Arizona Association of Assessing Officers

http://www.azdor.gov/

Join tax and public policy professionals from across Arizona at the 97th Annual Arizona Tax Conference.

This year’s conference features timely presentations on topics of interest to Arizona’s tax professionals and many concurrent sessions that enable the attendee to customize their conference experience.  

 Check out the schedule of events here.  

Register Now!

Cancellation Policy

Occasionally, unforseeable work demands prevent registrants from attending this event, even though they have registered. In such instances, it is essential that the registrant CANCEL their registration in writing. Cancellations must be directed to: Vicki Chappel at vchappel@azdor.gov. Registering for but not attending the conference is not a form of cancellation.

  • Cancellations received on or before September 8, 2014 will receive a full refund.
  • Cancellations received September 9-19, 2014 are subject to a $100 cancellation fee. In instances where payment is outstanding, you will receive an invoice for the cancellation fee.
  • No refunds will be given for cancellations received on or after September 20, 2014. 

Lodging Accommodations

J.W. Marriott Starr Pass Resort

To book your room you may call: 1.877.622.3140 or 1.506.474.2009

or book your hotel room online at the conference rate please click here. 

To receive the conference room rate, please specify that you are attending the “Arizona State Tax Conference“. 

You may guarantee your room with a major credit card. 

Hotel Rate: $86 + tax

All reservations must be made by September 26, 2014 to secure the conference rate.

Hotel Cancellations must be made a minimum of 72 hours in advance. 

***Note from Anna***

Arizona MMJ dispensaries and retail/MMJ farmers please stay on top of your tax laws. Don’t get blindsided by the IRS.

Overdose Of Prescription Drug Oxycodone Even Deadlier Than Heroin

Affordable Care Act, Alcohol industry, Arizona, Australia, Banking laws, Big pharma, California Medical Association, Cannabis, CBD, Choctaw Nation, Citizen abuse, Class action civil lawsuit, Colorado, Compassionate care, Compassionate use, Corruption, Cowboy Indian Alliance, DEA, Defeat the alcohol monopoly, Department of Revenue, Designer drugs, Drug War, Economy, Elder abuse, Eli Lilly, FBI, Fraud, Gov Jay Inslee, Government spending, Governor Jan Brewer, Governor Jerry Brown, Governor John Kitzhaber, Head trauma, Invasion of privacy, Job creation, Jobs, Kamala Harris, Law, Leon Panetta, Marijuana industry, Medicaid, Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, Medical, Medical Marijuana, Medicare, Medicine, Mental Illness treatment, Native Indigenous, Native Tribal, Obamacare, Occupy Wall Street, Patient abuse, Pfizer, Police, Politics, Poverty, Premeditated murder, President Obama, Prop 215, PTSD, Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, Recession, RICO, Robert Gates, Sen. Barbara Boxer, Tax havens, Tours/vacations Marijuana, Treason, U.S. Patent: 6630507 Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants, Uncategorized, United States, Universal Health Coverage

By Pooja Bhagat | International Business Times  August 31, 2014 8:57 PM EST

http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/564650/20140831/oxycodone-opioid-drug-overdose-awareness-day.htm#.VATUp6NhBki

Shocking revelations about oxycodone, which is a commonly used opioid painkiller, have emerged during the Overdose Awareness Day held on Sunday. As per the report released by National Coronial Information Systems, oxycodone has even surpassed notorious drug heroine with respect to being the deadliest opioid drug in Australia.

During the span of five years from 2007 to 2011, more than 3000 deaths have been recorded due to overdose on this opioid-based prescription medicine. This number has surpassed the deaths caused in the same span of time by heroin overdose.

As per the report, about three quarters of all opioid drug deaths are results of an overdose, particularly when these drugs were taken with other deadly narcotics and/or alcohol.

The acting CEO of Penington Institute, Wendy Dodd, shared some serious concerns with Herald Sun.com over these revelations. Penington Institute is a non-profit organization, which works closely with the issue of problematic drugs. “Heroin deaths appear to be declining which is great news, but pharmaceutical overdoses are rising alongside spiralling prescription rates,” she said.

Oxycodone is commonly used as a pain killer. It is a kind of narcotic pain medication. Another potentially dangerous medical drug identified is Fentanyl. It is available under the brand names Actiq, Duragesic, Lazanda and Sublimaze. This drug is mainly given to patients experiencing moderate to severe pain and who are already on opioid medications.

International Overdose Awareness Day is a global affair, which happens every year on August 31. It aims to raise the awareness of drug overdose and its fatal effects.

http://www.overdoseday.com/

Some of the points discussed in relation to oxycodone and other opioid drugs are mentioned in the following:

  • As per the data provided to Penington institute by Australian Bureau of Statistics, deaths are occurring every day due to drug overdose in Australia.
  • Overdoses even out-numbered the road fatalities in 2012. As per the statistics, overdose deaths totalled 1,427 in 2012, while road deaths, which have been steadily declining, ended the year at 1,338.
  • Oceania, which includes Australia and New Zealand, has a higher than the world average drug mortality rate. The UNODC said there were between 1,600 and 1,900 drug-related deaths in 2012.

To contact the editor, e-mail: editor@ibtimes.com

***Note from Anna: In America marijuana is considered more dangerous than Oxycodone.

http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ds.shtml

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Schedule I drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are:

heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote

Schedule II

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule I drugs, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are:

cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin

Schedule III

Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are:

Combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydrocodone per dosage unit (Vicodin), Products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone

Schedule IV

Schedule IV drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are:

Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien

Schedule V

Schedule V drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes. Some examples of Schedule V drugs are:

cough preparations with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin

 

From  Drugrehab101.com:

http://www.drugrehab101.com/articles89.html

“…The 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) revealed that 3,000,000 people over the age of 11 had tried OxyContin® for a nonmedical purpose, and 615,000 people tried OxyContin® for nonmedical use for the first time in 2004. But oxycodone is well in the public eye because it has widespread legal use, with 38,100,000 prescriptions in 2005, of which over 19% were for OxyContin®.

The 2006 Monitoring the Future Study revealed these figures for 2005 nonmedical use of OxyContin® by teens:

Nonmedical Use of OxyContin® by Students for the Year 2005

Grade

Percentage of Students

8th grade

1.8%

10th grade

3.2%

12th grade

5.5%

The use of oxycodones depends to a certain extent on the particular drug in question. Oxycodone is available in the U.S. as an oral solution, as tablets, and as extended release tablets. Combined with acetaminophen, it is available as an oral solution, as capsules, and as tablets. Combined with aspirin, it is available as a tablet.

OxyContin®, available as a time-release tablet, may be used intact, or crushed and chewed, snorted, or dissolved in water and then injected. The products that combine oxycodone with acetaminophen or aspirin are also abused orally.

Opioids, including Oxycodone, carry the risk of addiction, which is why they are “scheduled” drugs. They are abused both in overdoses when prescribed and used outside of prescriptions to get high, often accompanied with alcohol.

As early as the 1920s, oxycodone sold as Eukodal, was reported to create a “striking euphoria,” and its euphoric effects have been sought since.”

Other desired effects include:

  • euphoria
  • pain-killing properties
  • reduced anxiety
  • relaxation

Unsought effects include:

  • addiction
  • overdose

How is Oxycodone Used, Stats and Effects Sources:

  • emedicine.com
  • whitehousedrugpolicy.gov
  • drugabusestatistics.samhsa.gov
  • nlm.nih.gov
  • deadiversion.usdoj.gov
  • prescription-drug-rehab.com

 

Washington State:Maple Valley Physician’s License Revoked for Prescribing Controlled Drugs

Uncategorized, Medical, Corruption, Washington State, Patient abuse, United States:, United States, Gov Jay Inslee, WSLCB, DEA, University of Washington Medical, Highline Medical, Washington State hospitals, Medicaid, Affordable Care Act, Tax havens, Veteran abuse, Law, Seattle, Seattle PD, Big pharma, Occupy Wall Street, Addiction, Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, Fraud, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly, Occupy Seattle, Olympia
For immediate release: August 27, 2014 (14-122)

Contacts:     Marqise Allen, Communications Office 360-236-4072
  Kelly Stowe, Communications Office       360-236-4022

Maple Valley physician’s license revoked for prescribing controlled drugs

OLYMPIA — State health officials have permanently revoked the license of a Maple Valley osteopathic physician for not completing required training and continuing to prescribe controlled drugs after being told not to do so.

The Board of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery and the Washington State Department of Health initially suspended the license of Dale E. Alsager (DO.OP.00001485) in August of 2008. He was prohibited from prescribing schedule II and III controlled substances. Alsager didn’t complete mandatory training and continued to prescribe schedule III controlled substances while prohibited from the previous order. He also did not cooperate in the investigation of a more recent complaint.
The documents in this case can be seen online by clicking “Look up a health care provider” on the Department of Health website. Copies of the documents can be requested by calling 360-236-4700. The number can also be used to file complaints against health care providers in Washington.
The Board of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery regulates osteopathic physicians in Washington. Along with the Department of Health, it monitors and enforces qualifications for licensing consistent standards of practice.
The Department of Health website is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
###

8/14 Colorado Marijuana Workshop for State and Local Public Health- Recording and Materials

Activism, Affordable Care Act, Cancer, Cannabidiol, Cannabis, CBD, Charlotte'sWeb, Child patients, Citizen abuse, Class action civil lawsuit, Colorado, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, Compassionate care, Compassionate use, DEA, Denver, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, Eric Holder, Fake/altered MMj research, FBI, Fraud, General Election, Government spending, Growing, Invasion of privacy, IRS, Job creation, Jobs, Law, Legal Activist Working Group, Leon Panetta, Marijuana, Marijuana industry, Marijuana news, Medicaid, Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, Medical, Medical Marijuana, Medicare, Medicine, Mental Illness treatment, Meth epidemic, National Cannabis Industry Association, Native Tribal, Obamacare, Patient abuse, Police, Politics, PTSD, Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, Recall, Recession, RICO, Robert Gates, Taxes, Total Legalization, Tours/vacations Marijuana, Treason, U.S. Patent: 6630507 Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants, U.S. Treasury, Uncategorized, United States, Universal Health Coverage, Uruguay, Veteran abuse, Veterans, Voting, Weed for Votes

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/marijuana-workshop-state-and-local-public-health

Elyse Contreras Retail Marijuana Program & Medical Marijuana Research Grant Program

Programs Coordinator
P 303.692.6455 | F 303.782.0904
4300 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver, CO 80246
elyse.contreras@state.co.us
We hosted the Marijuana Workshop for State and Local Public Health on Aug. 14, 2014. 
 

Agenda

Presentations:

 

Medical Marijuana Registry – Natalie Riggins

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Natalie%20Riggins%20presentation.pdf

Medical Marijuana Research Grants Program – Ken Gershman

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Ken%20Gershman%20presentation.pdf

Retail Marijuana: Health Effects Surveillance – Tista Ghosh

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Tista%20Ghosh%20presentation.pdf

Retail Marijuana Public Helath Advisory Committee & Occupational Health and Safety Work Group – Mike Van Dyke

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Mike%20VanDyke%20presentationV2.pdf

WIC Surveillance – Jill Bonczynski, Tri-County Health Department

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Jill%20Bonczynski%20Presentation.pdf

Laboratory Contaminant Testing – Laura Gillim-Ross

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Laura%20Gillim-Ross%20presentation.pdf

Perspective of a marijuana insider handouts – Max Montrose

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Max%20Montrose%20Handout.pdf

Perspective of a marijuana insider PowerPoint presentation – Max Montrose

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Max%20Montrose%20presentation.pdf

Perspectives of a recommending physician – Joe Cohen

Office of Behavioral Health Community Prevention Programs and Statewide Efforts – Stan Paprocki, Colorado Department of Human Services

 

Public Health Prevention Services – Ali Maffey, CDPHE and Heath Harmon, Boulder County Public Health

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-ALI-MAFFEY-PRESENTATION.pdf

 

***Note from Anna. Please take the time to read this information.

Reschedule DEA Medical Marijuana as Class Five

Activism, Affordable Care Act, Anti-corruption, Arizona, Banking laws, Banks, Bible, Big pharma, California, Cancer, Cannabidiol, Cannabis, CBD, Charlotte'sWeb, Cheap weed, Child patients, Choctaw Nation, Citizen abuse, Class action civil lawsuit, Compassionate care, Compassionate use, Corruption, Cowboy Indian Alliance, DEA, Defeat the alcohol monopoly, Department of Agriculture, Department of Revenue, Dept. of Treasury, Economy, Elder abuse, Eli Lilly, Eric Holder, FBI, Fraud, GlaxoSmithKline, Gov Jay Inslee, Government spending, Governor Jan Brewer, Governor Jerry Brown, Growing, HIV, I-502, Invasion of privacy, IRS, Job creation, Jobs, Kamala Harris, Law, Legal Activist Working Group, Leon Panetta, Lydia Schaeffer, Marijuana, Marijuana industry, Marijuana news, Medicaid, Medical, Medical Marijuana, Medicare, Medicine, Mental Illness treatment, Meth epidemic, Methamphetamines, National Cannabis Industry Association, Native Indigenous, Native Tribal, Obamacare, Occupy Seattle, Olympia, Patient abuse, Police, Politics, Poverty, Premeditated murder, President Obama, Prop 215, PTSD, Public Citizen watchdog group, Recall, Recession, RICO, Robert Gates, Sally Schaeffer, Seattle, Seattle PD, Spiritual Use, Tax havens, Taxes, Total Legalization, Treason, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, U.S. Court of Appeals, U.S. Patent: 6630507 Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants, U.S. Treasury, Uncategorized, United States:, Universal Health Coverage, Uruguay, Veteran abuse, Veterans, Washington State, Washington State hospitals, Weed for Votes, WSLCB

http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ds.shtml

 

“The Drug Enforcement Administration was created by President Richard Nixon through an Executive Order in July 1973 in order to establish a single unified command to combat “an all-out global war on the drug menace.” At its outset, DEA had 1,470 Special Agents and a budget of less than $75 million. Today, the DEA has nearly 5,000 Special Agents and a budget of $2.02 billion.”

http://www.justice.gov/dea/about/history.shtml

DEA Drug Schedules

Drugs, substances, and certain chemicals used to make drugs are classified into five (5) distinct categories or schedules depending upon the drug’s acceptable medical use and the drug’s abuse or dependency potential.

The abuse rate is a determinate factor in the scheduling of the drug; for example, Schedule I drugs are considered the most dangerous class of drugs with a high potential for abuse and potentially severe psychological and/or physical dependence.

As the drug schedule changes– Schedule II, Schedule III, etc., so does the abuse potential– Schedule V drugs represents the least potential for abuse. A Listing of drugs and their schedule are located at Controlled Substance Act (CSA) Scheduling or CSA Scheduling by Alphabetical Order.

These lists describes the basic or parent chemical and do not necessarily describe the salts, isomers and salts of isomers, esters, ethers and derivatives which may also be classified as controlled substances. These lists are intended as general references and are not comprehensive listings of all controlled substances.

Please note that a substance need not be listed as a controlled substance to be treated as a Schedule I substance for criminal prosecution. A controlled substance analogue is a substance which is intended for human consumption and is structurally or pharmacologically substantially similar to or is represented as being similar to a Schedule I or Schedule II substance and is not an approved medication in the United States. (See 21 U.S.C. §802(32)(A) for the definition of a controlled substance analogue and 21 U.S.C. §813 for the schedule.)

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Schedule I drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are:

heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote

Schedule II

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule I drugs, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are:

cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin

Schedule III

Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are:

Combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydrocodone per dosage unit (Vicodin), Products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone

Schedule IV

Schedule IV drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are:

Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien

Schedule V

Schedule V drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes. Some examples of Schedule V drugs are:

cough preparations with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin

 

***Note from Anna: Reclassify medical marijuana on the DEA class schedule, allow it’s use for home grows, and tax it in reasonable fashion for retail. End the black market. Impeach, recall,or fire any cop or politician on the city, state, and federal levels who doesn’t agree.

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