Cheri Honkala- Broke & Blogging

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From Cheri Honkala: Green Party Vice Presidential Nominee – Poor Peoples Advocate

cheri honkala philly

Why have I decided to create a blog?

After many sleepless nights and tears in the shower, I have come to understand that one of the most important things that I can contribute to the elimination of poverty and homelessness is to put a light on these inhumane conditions. There are too many people receiving profits from the every-day lives of the impoverished people in this country who continue to remain invisible. So one of the best things that I can do is to speak loud, daily and often.

In this blog, I hope to convey how much we need you in this movement. My goal is to show the reality of the inhumane horrors families have to endure daily through my words, videos, and pictures. You will not hear about these things on CNN or even through many so-called “progressive” organizations’ blogs and social media campaigns.

I have to be careful because I want to stay alive and out of prison yet I will continue to push the envelope to talk about not only poverty, but the politics of hunger and homelessness in America.

The reason I am charging money for this blog is to raise funds for the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign.  This will allow us to raise some independent money separate of our oppressors that continue to fund the non-profit industrial complex (charities controlled by corporations). To my poor friends out there, of course I will give you complete access if you send me an email at

“There are millions of poor people in this country who have very little, or even nothing, to lose. If they can be helped to take action together, they will do so with the freedom and a power that will be a new and unsettling force in our complacent national life” – Martin Luther King Jr.

Senate Organization Chart for the 114th Congress

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The Virtual Reference Desk provides resources about Senate Leadership, committees, and officers.


Alex Garland’s Black Lives Matter 2015: Activists March Through Seattle’s Central District in Protest for Police Accountability

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More than 150 activists marched from Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park to the King County Juvenile Detention Center on 12th Ave. in Seattle during a demonstration for police accountability.

Activists took to the streets, stopping at several intersections along the way for moments of silence and speak-outs. Support was shown as the protest marched down Rainier Ave. as people put their fists up or raised hands in a sign of solidarity.

From the Facebook event page…

“We, as young people, have chosen to come forth and call out the many inequalities within the current Criminal Justice System. This system has blatantly devalued, dehumanized, and dismissed people of color. The Black and African-American Communities in the United States have especially been targeted. We are outraged with this systemic failure.

To not act is an injustice within itself. As citizens we need to step up and no longer allow law enforcement to abuse our powers. The current state of the Criminal Justice System has increased persecution of Black and African-American people.

We will no longer tolerate the mistreatment, lack of support, and denied opportunities for this community. We are addressing these issues through peaceful protests, unifying actions, and productive dialogues.

We invite law enforcement, elected officials, and community members to join the movement towards police accountability.

In order to ensure the mission of this protest is accurately portrayed we have come up with some guidelines. They are as follows:

• Do NOT touch the police officers
• Do NOT deface/destroy city or private property
• Do NOT move city or private property

If you do not follow these guidelines you will be asked to stop. If your actions continue you will be asked to leave.”

Peace & Love,
Women of Color for Systemic Change

“Black Lives Matter.” – Protest for Police Accountability

Third Party Candidates Disagree on Legalizing Marijuana, Education Policy

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 Christopher Goins

By Christopher Goins

Four third party presidential candidates debated civil liberties, education policy, and drug policy among other topics last week at a debate hosted by the Free and Equal Elections Foundation.

The debate was held last Tuesday, October 23, where participants Justice Party candidate Rocky Anderson, Green Party candidate Jill Stein, Constitution Party candidate Virgil Goode, and Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson took on questions from moderators Larry King and Christina Tobin.

On Drug Prohibition and the Federal “War on Drugs”

All but one of the third party presidential candidates agreed on legalizing marijuana.

“We don’t need to just legalize marijuana, we need to end drug prohibition just like we ended alcohol prohibition and treat drug use and abuse as a public health and education issue and get it entirely out of the criminal justice system,” said Anderson, noting that the United States has the largest incarceration rate in the world.

“We have more in prison on drug offenses than Western Europe on all offenses,” Anderson continued.

Gary Johnson concurred on legalization.

“Ninety-percent of the drug is prohibition-related not use-related and that is not to discount the problems with use and abuse but that should be the focus. So let’s legalize marijuana now,” said Johnson. ”So let’s regulate it. Let’s tax it.”

Johnson admitted that he is “not a hypocrite on this issue,” acknowledging that he has smoked marijuana and drank alcohol in the past, but no longer does so.

“But I can tell you categorically that no category is marijuana more dangerous than alcohol and yet we are arresting 1.8 million a year in this country on drug-related crimes,” Johnson said.

Marijuana legalization “is not about advocating drug use,” says Johnson.

Additionally, Johnson noted that of those who graduate from high school, 50 percent of them have smoked marijuana, and added that is an issue that should be dealt with within the family and not the criminal justice system.

He also called “meth,” short for methamphetamine, the “boogeyman drug,” saying that use falls “disparagingly” on the poor.

“It’s the best example we can think of a prohibition drug. It’s cheap. It’s easy to make so the consequences fall disparagingly of the poor,” Johnson said.

The lone medical doctor on the stage brought her medical experience to bear onto the issue.

“As a medical doctor previously in clinical practice for about 25 years,” said Jill Stein, “I can say with a real understanding of the science and the health impacts, that marijuana is a substance that is dangerous because its illegal. It’s not illegal on account of being dangerous because its not dangerous at all.”

“It is well understood that the health impacts of marijuana are mainly the public health and safety impacts from the illegal drug trade associated with marijuana prohibition,” she continued. “So the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it.”

Jill Stein says that on Day One a president could instruct the Drug Enforcement Agency to use science to determine what substances will and will not be scheduled.

“Because the minute science is used marijuana is off the schedule,” she said. “The same goes for hemp which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. There are no bad health and safety effects.”

Marijuana should be regulated, Stein says, but not in a way that will lead to a monopoly like the tobacco industry “but permits small businesses to actually flourish.”

Former Rep. Virgil Goode (R-Va.) said that he would not legalize drugs, but that he would cut back federal spending on the “war on drugs,” emphasizing that the so-called “war on drugs” is a minor part of the federal budget, and called drug use a state issue.

On the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA)

All of the candidates agreed on either repealing or vetoing the National Defense Authorization Act, a bill signed by President Obama on December 31, 2011, which the American Civil Liberties Union says codifies “indefinite military detention without charge or trial into law for the first time in American history.”

“The NDAA’s dangerous detention provisions would authorize the president — and all future presidents — to order the military to pick up and indefinitely imprison people captured anywhere in the world, far from any battlefield,” said the ACLU in a blog post.

JIll Stein called the NDAA “a basic offense against the very foundation of american liberty,” and said that it should be repealed.

“We should also repeal the presidents interpretation of the enforcement act of 2001 – the military use act – that said that assassinations are in the power of the president,” Stein said.

The Justice Party candidate said: “What we have seen through the Bush years and now with President Obama has been so absolutely subversive and anti-American.”

Anderson continued: “There’s been no more anti-American act in our history than the NDAA. President Obama, don’t be fooled about this, in 2009 he asked for the power to indefinitely detain people without charges, without a trial, without legal assistance, and without the right to habeas corpus.”

“We are on the road to totalitarianism and that’s not an exaggeration,” Anderson said.

On Education Policy

Johnson explained that because of “guaranteed government student loans” prospective college students have no excuse for not pursuing education.

Colleges and universities, he contended, are “immune” from offering lower prices that they would otherwise have to if a prospective student had to re-think their ability to pay for tuition.

But, he added, “when that happens enmasse I guarantee you the cost of college tuition the price would drop dramatically,” noting that is a situation that currently does not exist.

He called the current state of affairs where college tuition is high and unaffordable is one of the “unintended consequences” of the current government intervention in higher education.

Jill Stein took a different view.

“I think its time to make public higher education free as it should be,” Stein said.

Stein likened the idea to the G.I. Bill and public high school education. But Johnson disagreed.

“Free comes with a cost. Free, very simply, is spending more money than what you take in,” Johnson said. “Free is simply accumulating more to the $16 trillion dollars in debt that we currently have. Free is gotten us to the point where we are going to experience a monetary collapse in this country, due to the fact that we continue to borrow and print more money than we take in,” he shot back.

“This is what has to stop in this country is the notion of free.”

But Anderson and Stein disagreed.

“We can not afford not to provide a great education and equality of opportunity for all of our young people in this country. We need to insist on prosperity, not austerity,” said Anderson, who was seconded by Stein.

In his rebuttal, Virgil Goode pointed out that President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney both wanted to expand Pell grants and student loans, per Romney’s statements in a recent presidential debate.

“You’ve got four candidates you can look to if that’s your big issue,” Goode said, pointing to Stein and Anderson positions on education.

Another Potential Outdoor Marijuana Cultivation Ban in California

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 MMJ business Daily December 10, 2014

More than 300 people, mostly medical cannabis patients and growers, attended a meeting in Yuba County, California, as supervisors considered a ban on outdoor marijuana cultivation.

About 45 people spoke during the event in which supervisors considered three ordinances from other counties – Sacramento, Shasta and Fresno – that all ban outdoor grows in the wake of court rulings allowing them to impose severe restrictions on cannabis cultivation, according to the Appeal-Democrat.

Patients told county supervisors a ban on outdoor grows was a bad idea during a three-hour workshop, while others were in favor of the moratorium, saying they’ve seen their neighborhoods turned into a “war zone,” the newspaper said.

In question is a Yuba County ordinance adopted in 2012 that allows 18 outdoor plants on less than an acre, 30 on one to five acres, 60 on five to 20 acres and 99 plants on parcels bigger than 20 acres. Opponents of the ban told board they’d be increasing the burden on law enforcement and creating a new class of criminals. Proponents said Yuba County has become a haven for criminals.

After three hours of testimony, supervisors didn’t discuss any of the model ordinances or testimony, delaying further discussion until Jan. 13.