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8/14 Colorado Marijuana Workshop for State and Local Public Health- Recording and Materials

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/marijuana-workshop-state-and-local-public-health

Elyse Contreras Retail Marijuana Program & Medical Marijuana Research Grant Program

Programs Coordinator
P 303.692.6455 | F 303.782.0904
4300 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver, CO 80246
elyse.contreras@state.co.us
We hosted the Marijuana Workshop for State and Local Public Health on Aug. 14, 2014. 
 

Agenda

Presentations:

 

Medical Marijuana Registry – Natalie Riggins

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Natalie%20Riggins%20presentation.pdf

Medical Marijuana Research Grants Program – Ken Gershman

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Ken%20Gershman%20presentation.pdf

Retail Marijuana: Health Effects Surveillance – Tista Ghosh

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Tista%20Ghosh%20presentation.pdf

Retail Marijuana Public Helath Advisory Committee & Occupational Health and Safety Work Group – Mike Van Dyke

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Mike%20VanDyke%20presentationV2.pdf

WIC Surveillance – Jill Bonczynski, Tri-County Health Department

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Jill%20Bonczynski%20Presentation.pdf

Laboratory Contaminant Testing – Laura Gillim-Ross

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Laura%20Gillim-Ross%20presentation.pdf

Perspective of a marijuana insider handouts – Max Montrose

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Max%20Montrose%20Handout.pdf

Perspective of a marijuana insider PowerPoint presentation – Max Montrose

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-Max%20Montrose%20presentation.pdf

Perspectives of a recommending physician – Joe Cohen

Office of Behavioral Health Community Prevention Programs and Statewide Efforts – Stan Paprocki, Colorado Department of Human Services

 

Public Health Prevention Services – Ali Maffey, CDPHE and Heath Harmon, Boulder County Public Health

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/CHEIS-ALI-MAFFEY-PRESENTATION.pdf

 

***Note from Anna. Please take the time to read this information.

Reschedule DEA Medical Marijuana as Class Five

http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ds.shtml

 

“The Drug Enforcement Administration was created by President Richard Nixon through an Executive Order in July 1973 in order to establish a single unified command to combat “an all-out global war on the drug menace.” At its outset, DEA had 1,470 Special Agents and a budget of less than $75 million. Today, the DEA has nearly 5,000 Special Agents and a budget of $2.02 billion.”

http://www.justice.gov/dea/about/history.shtml

DEA Drug Schedules

Drugs, substances, and certain chemicals used to make drugs are classified into five (5) distinct categories or schedules depending upon the drug’s acceptable medical use and the drug’s abuse or dependency potential.

The abuse rate is a determinate factor in the scheduling of the drug; for example, Schedule I drugs are considered the most dangerous class of drugs with a high potential for abuse and potentially severe psychological and/or physical dependence.

As the drug schedule changes– Schedule II, Schedule III, etc., so does the abuse potential– Schedule V drugs represents the least potential for abuse. A Listing of drugs and their schedule are located at Controlled Substance Act (CSA) Scheduling or CSA Scheduling by Alphabetical Order.

These lists describes the basic or parent chemical and do not necessarily describe the salts, isomers and salts of isomers, esters, ethers and derivatives which may also be classified as controlled substances. These lists are intended as general references and are not comprehensive listings of all controlled substances.

Please note that a substance need not be listed as a controlled substance to be treated as a Schedule I substance for criminal prosecution. A controlled substance analogue is a substance which is intended for human consumption and is structurally or pharmacologically substantially similar to or is represented as being similar to a Schedule I or Schedule II substance and is not an approved medication in the United States. (See 21 U.S.C. §802(32)(A) for the definition of a controlled substance analogue and 21 U.S.C. §813 for the schedule.)

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Schedule I drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are:

heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote

Schedule II

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule I drugs, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are:

cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin

Schedule III

Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are:

Combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydrocodone per dosage unit (Vicodin), Products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone

Schedule IV

Schedule IV drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are:

Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien

Schedule V

Schedule V drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes. Some examples of Schedule V drugs are:

cough preparations with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin

 

***Note from Anna: Reclassify medical marijuana on the DEA class schedule, allow it’s use for home grows, and tax it in reasonable fashion for retail. End the black market. Impeach, recall,or fire any cop or politician on the city, state, and federal levels who doesn’t agree.

November 12-14, 2014 3rd Annual Marijuana Business Conference and Expo-Las Vegas

https://mmjbusinessdaily.com/conference/agenda/

Formerly the National Marijuana Business Conference & Expo

Join 1,500 cannabusiness pros and major investors from more than 30 US states and 10 countries at the industry’s biggest and oldest national conference.

Produced by Marijuana Business Daily, the industry’s most trusted professional news source, the Conference brings you:

  • 28 exclusive new sessions (click for agenda)
  • 60+ expert speakers – keynote by Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry’s!
  • Networking with over 1500+ industry professionals
  • Largest EXPO floor with 125+ exhibitors with the latest products, innovations, and tools to grow your business.
  • Marijuana Business Crash Course
  • Women’s Business Networking Breakfast
  • Investor Pitch Slam featuring live investor presentations.

 

Video about event:

https://mmjbusinessdaily.com/conference/why-attend/

Sponsors: https://mmjbusinessdaily.com/conference/expo/

Washington State Liquor Control Board FAQs on Taxes

http://www.liq.wa.gov/marijuana/faqs-on-taxes

What are my Marijuana Excise Tax Obligations?
Per RCW 69.50.535 and WAC 314-55-089, all licensees are required to remit to the Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) an excise tax of 25 percent on all taxable sales of marijuana, marijuana concentrates, useable marijuana, and marijuana-infused products. This tax is specific to marijuana sales and does not include transportation costs or retail sales tax amounts.

Exemptions to the above where the 25 percent excise tax is not applied:

  • Transfers from licensed producers to licensed processors when they are the same entity. For example, Producer A is also Processor A. The transfer from production to processing is not a sale because it is the same entity.
  • Processor to processor sales, regardless of entity. House Bill 2304 authorized processor to processor sales but did not include any taxation.

When can I pay my excise tax?
The reporting period closes on the last day of the calendar month. You can confirm and pay your excise tax obligation any time after that.

When is my excise tax due?
Confirmation and payment of excise taxes are due no later than the 20th day of each month for the previous month’s activity. (For example: taxes for the July reporting period are due no later than August 20th.)

How do I pay my excise tax?
WSLCB will accept cash, check, cashier’s check, or money order as payment of your excise tax obligation. Cash payments will be accepted in person by appointment only at our Olympia HQ location. Please call 360-664-1789 to schedule a payment appointment.

Can I pay at Department of Revenue?
No. The Department of Revenue will not accept payments for marijuana excise tax at this time.

What should I do if I have a discrepancy in sales data or excise tax amount due?
Contact the WSLCB Marijuana Tax Unit at marijuanataxes@lcb.wa.gov or 360-664-1789. We are here to assist you with any discrepancies or irregularities.

What happens if I do not pay my taxes by the required deadline?
Per WAC 314-55-092, a penalty of 2 percent per month will be assessed on any past due payments. Failure to make a report and/or pay the license taxes and/or penalties in the manner and dates outlined in WAC 314-55-089 will be sufficient grounds for the board to suspend or revoke a marijuana license.

http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=314-55-092

What if a marijuana licensee fails to report or pay, or reports or pays late?

(1) If a marijuana licensee does not submit its monthly reports and payment(s) to the board as required in WAC 314-55-089: The licensee is subject to penalties.
Penalties: A penalty of two percent per month will be assessed on any payments postmarked after the twentieth day of the month following the month of sale. When the twentieth day of the month falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or a legal holiday, the filing must be postmarked by the U.S. Postal Service no later than the next postal business day.
Absent a postmark, the date received at the liquor control board or authorized designee, will be used to assess the penalty of two percent per month on payments received after the twentieth day of the month following the month of sale.
(2) Failure to make a report and/or pay the license taxes and/or penalties in the manner and dates outlined in WAC 314-55-089 will be sufficient grounds for the board to suspend or revoke a marijuana license.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 69.50.342 and 69.50.345. WSR 14-10-044, § 314-55-092, filed 4/30/14, effective 5/31/14. Statutory Authority: RCW 69.50.325, 69.50.331, 69.50.342, 69.50.345. WSR 13-21-104, § 314-55-092, filed 10/21/13, effective 11/21/13.]

Can I charge the purchaser for the excise tax?
The excise tax is the obligation of the seller. Any of this tax obligation intended to be passed on to the purchaser should be included in the sale price of the product.

http://dor.wa.gov/Content/FindTaxesAndRates/marijuana/Default.aspx

Taxes due on recreational marijuana

Do you hold a producer, processor or retailer marijuana business license issued by the Liquor Control Board? If so, you will also owe taxes to the Washington State Department of Revenue.

Applicable taxes

Business and occupation (B&O) tax applies to your business’s gross receipts. You also must collect and remit to Revenue the sales tax on your retail transactions. The fact sheets at right explain your obligations.

How to file and pay your taxes

Log on to Revenue’s My Account to file your monthly returns. You must file each month. If you have no business activity to report, you still must file a “no business” return.

You can also pay your taxes through My Account.

Businesses that cannot pay electronically must apply for a waiver and, in the meantime, pay their taxes by check, money order or cash.

Mail checks to:

Washington State Department of Revenue
PO Box 47464
Olympia WA 98504-7464

Cash payments – where to pay

To make an appointment to pay your taxes in cash, choose a field office location. Appointments are necessary for tax payments of $20,000 or more.

Please schedule your appointment before the due date. We encourage early payments (before the 25th) if using cash. Penalties may apply if you don’t pay your taxes by the 25th. 

Excise taxes (25 percent) paid to Liquor Control Board

Revenue is NOT accepting tax payments for the Liquor Control Board. Excise taxes due to the Liquor Control Board must be paid to them electronically or at their office in Olympia.

http://dor.wa.gov/Content/FindTaxesAndRates/marijuana/Default.aspx

Special Notice WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE

http://dor.wa.gov/Docs/Pubs/SpecialNotices/2014/sn_14_SB6505.pdf

PO BOX 47478 |OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON 98504-7478 | 1-800-647-7706 |

DOR.WA.GOV

Special Notice

 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
Recreational and Medical Marijuana – Repeal and Clarification
of Excise Tax Deductions, Exemptions, and Preferential Rates
Effective June 12, 2014, recreational and medical marijuana producers, processors, retailers, and businesses that provide services to marijuana businesses are excluded from certain business and occupation (B&O) tax deductions, exemptions, and preferential rates; retail sales and use tax exemptions; and other excise tax exemptions and deductions.
In addition, sales of marijuana to consumers are not eligible for any retail sales tax or use tax exemptions. (See Senate Bill (SB)6505 [Chapter 140, Laws of 2014].)Property Tax Exemptions:
For information about property tax exemptions affected by SB 6505, please see our Property Tax Special Notice – 2014 Legislative Updates: Current
Use, Marijuana, and Designated Forest Land Legislation
Note:
For purposes of this notice the term “marijuana” is used to refer to marijuana, useable marijuana, and marijuana-infused products, including marijuana concentrates, as those terms are defined under RCW 69.50.101and Engrossed Substitute House Bill (ESHB) 2304 (Chapter 192, Laws of 2014)
.
Do Any Excise Tax Deductions, Exemptions, or Preferential Rates Apply to Marijuana Before June 12, 2014?
Before June 12, 2014, businesses producing, processing, and selling marijuana and businesses that provide services to marijuana businesses may qualify for tax deductions and exemptions discussed below, if a business otherwise meets the specific requirements of that deduction or exemption.
SB 6505 also clarified that marijuana did not qualify for certain tax deductions, exemptions, or preferential rates before June 12, 2014. This special notice will specifically state when a tax deduction, exemption, or preferential rate listed in this notice does not apply before June 12, 2014.
Quick Reference Table:
At the end of this notice is a table that lists the excise tax
deductions, exemptions, and preferential rates in this notice by RCW and states if they applied before June 12, 2014.
ISSUED JUNE 12, 2014
****Note from Anna:
Are sales of “Medical Cannabis” subject to sales tax?

 

In the state of Washington, sales of medical cannabis are retail sales. As such, the selling price is subject to retail sales tax. In addition, the seller is subject to the business and occupation (B&O) tax under the retailing classification. This is true even if it is sold by a medical cannabis dispensary.

 

Sales of medical cannabis are not eligible for the retail sales tax exemption provided for prescription drugs. RCW 82.08.0281 provides an exemption from retail sales tax for certain drugs, but only when prescribed as authorized by the laws of this state. However, cannabis is a Schedule I controlled substance and cannot be prescribed under either federal or state law in Washington.

 

Chapter 69.51A RCW addresses medical cannabis, but does not authorize the prescription of medical cannabis. This chapter specifically avoids authorization of a prescription by referring to “valid documentation”, which does not equate with a prescription as defined in RCW 82.08.0281(4)(a), or as provided in RCW 69.50.308 (Prescriptions). Chapter 69.51A provides that it is only intended to protect qualifying patients, designated providers, and physicians from liability, prosecution, or criminal guilt when cannabis is possessed, used, provided or authorized.

In addition, sales of cannabis-infused products (edibles, liquids, etc.) are not eligible for the retail sales tax exemption provided for food and food ingredients under RCW 82.08.0293 as these products are not “food or food ingredients.” Therefore retail sales tax applies on sales of cannabis-infused products.

 

See our Special Notice – Sales of Medical Cannabis Remain Subject to Sales Tax (pdf)

 

Note:
Senate Bill (SB) 6505 [Chapter 140, Laws of 2014] clarified that marijuana, useable marijuana, and marijuana infused-products, including marijuana concentrates are not drugs for purposes of the sales tax exemption under RCW 82.08.0281 for prescription drugs.

 

SB 6505 also clarified that marijuana, useable marijuana, and marijuana infused-products, including marijuana concentrates are not food or food ingredients for purposes of the sales tax exemption under RCW 82.08.0293 for food and food ingredients.

These clarifications do not change how sales of medical cannabis (marijuana) are taxed. Whether sold for recreational or medical purposes, all sales of cannabis are subject to retail sales tax. For more information on these clarifications, see our Special Notice: Recreational and Medical Marijuana – Repeal and Clarification of Excise Tax Deductions, Exemptions, and Preferential Rates.

Washington State Legislature SB 6505

Colorado Marijuana Tax Fifth Amendment Hearing on Friday August 22 2014

For immediate release: August 21, 2014

*Please COPY and REDISTRIBUTE*

{Denver} — There will be a preliminary injunction hearing in Denver
District Court on Friday in a lawsuit brought by marijuana civil rights
activists seeking to protect their Fifth Amendment right against
self-incrimination. Plaintiffs will argue in front of The Honorable Judge
John Madden IV that payment of marijuana taxes violates a citizen’s Fifth
Amendment right against self-incrimination, since marijuana remains illegal
under federal law.

*THE PUBLIC IS ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND THIS HEARING*

Date: Friday, August 22, 2014
Time: 9am to 12noon
Location: Denver District Court (Old Building)
1437 Bannock St.
Denver, Colorado
Courtroom #203: The Honorable Judge John Madden IV

Note: Please dress nicely and maintain quiet in the courtroom. Bring a
photo ID with, as you may have to show it to get through courthouse
security.

*BACKGROUND*
Attorney Robert J. Corry, Jr. filed the lawsuit on June 9, 2014 seeking to
permanently end Colorado’s marijuana taxes, on the grounds that payment of
the taxes forces citizens to incriminate themselves as criminals under
federal law.

The complaint was filed on behalf of an unnamed licensed medical and retail
marijuana center, the “No Over Taxation” issue committee (which campaigned
against Proposition AA, the marijuana tax issue approved by Colorado voters
in 2013) and several individuals, including Kathleen Chippi, Larisa
Bolivar, Miguel Lopez and William Chengelis.

Corry is seeking unspecified damages and a refund of all tax monies
collected by the state.

If successful, Corry’s lawsuit could be the basis for overturning ALL
regulations regarding marijuana licensing and registration in Colorado on
the same grounds.

As long as marijuana remains illegal under federal law,
states cannot require people to give any information about themselves in
order to distribute or purchase marijuana. ANY and ALL requirements to
identify oneself would result in a “real and appreciable” risk of
self-incrimination, and would require a citizen to implicate himself in
federal crimes.

As witnesses, the State of Colorado has called attorneys Brian Vicente and
Christian Sederberg, two self-proclaimed “marijuana lawyers” who helped
campaign for Amendment 64, to provide testimony to support the State’s
assertion that payment of these taxes is not incriminating.

Read more about the Fifth Amendment here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution

Corry cites a 1973 Colorado Supreme Court case (People vs. Duleff) that
overturned a man’s conviction for “selling marijuana without a license”
because compliance with the licensing requirement would have required that
person to violate his constitutional right against self-incrimination and
reveal a violation of federal law. Corry writes, “The Colorado Supreme
Court held specifically that the Fifth Amendment prohibits state licensing
requirements that force a person to reveal a violation of federal law.”

From the Duleff decision, Corry quotes the Colo. Sup. Ct.:
“The Fifth Amendment prohibits licensing requirements from being used as a
means of discovering past or present criminal activity which is subject to
prosecution by calling attention to the licensee and his
activities….There is no doubt that the information which Duleff would
have been required to disclose would have been useful to the investigation
of his activities, would have substantially increased the risk of
prosecution, and may well have been a direct admission of guilt under
federal law. The Fifth Amendment protects individuals from such compulsory,
incriminating disclosures and provides a complete defense to prosecution.”
– Colorado Supreme Court (1973)

Corry also cites a 1969 US Supreme Court case (Timothy Leary v. United
States) in which the highest court in the country overturned Leary’s
marijuana possession conviction and ruled that the federal Marihuana Tax
Act of 1937 was illegal, due to the fact that a person seeking a tax stamp
and complying with the law would be forced to incriminate himself, in
violation of the Fifth Amendment.

Corry writes, “Marijuana-specific taxes require plaintiffs and any other
person paying said taxes to incriminate themselves as committing multiple
violations of federal law, including but not limited to, participating in,
aiding and abetting, or conspiring to commit a ‘continuing criminal
enterprise’ and ‘money laundering.’ These illegally-collected taxes are
ultimately laundered by the State of Colorado through J.P. Morgan Chase
Bank, which also participates knowingly in the continuing criminal
enterprise.” Item 67, Corry complaint filed 6/9/14.

Corry concludes, “It is illegal for government to retain tax monies
illegally collected in violation of the constitution, so all amounts must
be returned, and all records related to previous tax payments, destroyed.”

Corry asks the Court to:
“Enter a temporary restraining order, preliminary injunction, and/or
permanent injunction ordering the Defendants, and all those acting in
concert with them, to cease and desist from enforcement of the marijuana
tax statutes, to cease and desist from any further collection, deposit, or
laundering of the marijuana taxes, for a full refund of marijuana tax
monies paid by any person or entity, and for destruction of all tax records
and identifying information after full refunds are made.”

“The state can’t have it both ways. If it’s illegal under federal law, you
cannot collect taxes on it,” says Kathleen Chippi, a plaintiff and member
of the Patient and Caregiver Rights Litigation Project. “We have another
case pending in the Colorado Supreme Court now, Coats v. Dish Network,
where Colorado Attorney General John Suthers argues that medical marijuana
patients can be fired from their jobs for using medical marijuana off-duty,
even though it is legal under state law. Suthers argues in the Coats case
that, since marijuana is still illegal under federal law, patients have no
rights.”

“Yet Suthers and Hickenlooper, as kingpins in their continuing criminal
enterprise, happily collect and spend the marijuana taxes, even though they
were collected in spite of multiple clear violations of federal law,”
Chippi concludes.

Read Boulder Weekly article on Federal Preemption issues and the Coats v.
Dish Lawsuit (5/22/14):
http://www.boulderweekly.com/article-12900-local-attorney-argues-fed-laws-donrst-apply-to-mmj.html

*FOR MORE INFORMATION*

Click here to read the complaint
No Over Taxation, et al, v. Hickenlooper, et al
http://www.cannabistherapyinstitute.com/legal/colorado/propaa.complaint.corry.pdf

People v. Duleff (Colorado Supreme Court case)
http://www.cannabistherapyinstitute.com/legal/colorado/people.v.duleff.html

US v. Leary (US Supreme Court case)
http://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/395/6/

Read more about the Fifth Amendment here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution

Patient and Caregiver Rights Litigation Project
*DONATE ONLINE*
http://www.cannabislawsuits.com/

Denver 420 Rally
http://420rally.org/

Law Firm of Robert J. Corry, Jr.
http://www.robcorry.com/

*PRESS CONTACTS*

Contact: Robert J. Corry, Jr.: (303) 634-2244
Kathleen Chippi: 888-EAT-HEMP (888-328-4367)

Provided as a Public Service by the:
Cannabis Therapy Institute
Phone: 877-420-4205
Web: http://www.CannabisTherapyInstitute.com/
Email: info@cannabistherapyinstitute.com

 

***Note from Anna: Fight for your right to cannabis or lose it. The politicians have made it very,very clear that all marijuana cultivation is going into the full control of the Federal government, no matter what the state governors think. Dispensaries, activists, and patients had better pay 100 percent attention to this case.  Every state in America is looking at Colorado for direction with setting,or eliminating, cannabis legalization laws.

If the Colorado activists lose, patients in all of the marijuana states can expect mediocre mass-produced GMO’d, barely effective weed for the little people and high-quality organic cannabis for the rich.That is if it isn’t banned altogether due to quality control, supply and demand, or greed issues by the people in control of it’s cultivation.

If citizens refuse to participate in making sure cannabis is legal then definitely learn to grow your own, but don’t be surprised if home grows of any size are met with full police/FBI/DEA response. Rich people will not allow for the poor people to prosper financially with cannabis because it means THEY lose money and the citizens would be united to vote out ALL of the politicians who betrayed them.

Time is running out until the big money fake activists and lobbyists, hell-bent on locking up cannabis for the friends, politicians, and big businesses who pay them, betray the MMJ patients. The lobbyists and politicians will absolutely betray their constituents for Election 2016 profits. Voter abuses have happened before, and they will happen again if the citizens do not very closely monitor the actions of their politicians.

 

AZ Marijuana Cards Likely to Be Accepted at Nevada Dispensaries

http://azmarijuana.com/ By:   |   Posted : Aug.14.14

Nevada Marijuanahttp://azmarijuana.com/arizona-medical-marijuana-news/nevada-dispensaries-accept-arizona-marijuana-cards/

Authorities in Nevada are working on a plan that would allow medical marijuana patients from other states, including Arizona, to purchase medical marijuana at Nevada dispensaries, which will be opening in early 2015.

The bureau chief of the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health said that Nevada’s new medical marijuana program will allow Arizona residents to shop at dispensaries if they are part of the medical marijuana program in Arizona.

Brian Sandoval, the governor of Nevada, has officially said that up to 66 dispensaries will open all over the state, with the first expected to open in Las Vegas at the beginning of 2015.

According to state law, Nevada dispensaries can choose to honor out of state medical marijuana cardholders as long as the state that issued their license has an electronic database of patients that “allows the Division and medical marijuana dispensaries in (Nevada) to access the database.”

This measure would obviously need to first be approved by authorities in Arizona.  Will Humble, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, is hesitant to believe that this law would ever work out in conjunction with Arizona cardholders because the system in which medical marijuana is sold and regulated is specific to Arizona dispensaries.  However, Nevada authorities are confident that once the organized system is functioning by early 2015, their dispensaries won’t even need to access the database in Arizona, and that onsite dispensary agents will be able to validate the out-of-towners’ licenses.

There are more than a few details that need ironing out, but if all goes according to plan, Arizona medical marijuana cardholders and other states will have a few more reasons to visit Las Vegas next year.

 

Japan to Start Exporting Fukushima Rice to Singapore / “Singapore Was Convinced to Lift Import Restriction”

Rice produced in Fukushima is going to be exported to Singapore.

JA Zen-Noh (The National Federation of Agricultural Cooperative Associations) announced on 8/18/2014.

Since 311, the government of Singapore banned importing Fukushima rice. JA Zen-Noh comments they have convinced the government of Singapore to deregulate the safety level of rice.

Currently the press release is removed from the website of JA Zen-Noh for some reason.

 

http://search.zennoh.or.jp/bizsearch_asp/search?corpId=atc130002&vc=1&layout=1&hits=10&q=%E3%82%B7%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AC%E3%83%9D%E3%83%BC%E3%83%AB%E3%80%80%E8%BC%B8%E5%87%BA&p=1&t%5B%5D=1

 

http://maguro.2ch.sc/test/read.cgi/poverty/1408364601/l50

 

 

You read this now because we’ve been surviving until today.

_____

Français :

Le Japon va commencer à exporter du riz de Fukushima sur Singapour / “Singapour a été convaincu pour lever les restrictions d’importation”

 

Le riz produit à Fukushima va être exporté sur Singapour.

JA Zen-Noh (la Fédération Nationale des Associations de Coopératives Agricoles Japonaises) l’a annoncé ce 18 août 2014.
Le gouvernement de Singapour avait interdit l’importation du riz de Fukushima depuis le 11-3. JA Zen-Noh déclare qu’ils ont convaincu le gouvernement de Singapour de déréguler le niveau de sécurité du riz.

Actuellement, le communiqué de presse a été retiré du site web de la JA Zen-Noh.

http://search.zennoh.or.jp/bizsearch_asp/search?corpId=atc130002&vc=1&layout=1&hits=10&q=%E3%82%B7%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AC%E3%83%9D%E3%83%BC%E3%83%AB%E3%80%80%E8%BC%B8%E5%87%BA&p=1&t%5B%5D=1

http://maguro.2ch.sc/test/read.cgi/poverty/1408364601/l50

Vous pouvez lire ceci parce que nous avons survécu jusqu’à aujourd’hui.

 

***Note from Anna: If that radioactive rice spreads and mixes with Monsanto crops farms worldwide will be contaminated.

Fake Charities, Drug Cartels, Ransom and Extortion: Where Islamist Group Boko Haram Gets Its Cash

Fake Charities, Drug Cartels, Ransom and Extortion: Where Islamist Group Boko Haram Gets Its Cash

http://www.ibtimes.com/fake-charities-drug-cartels-ransom-extortion-where-islamist-group-boko-haram-gets-its-cash-1585743

  • Boko Haram Bomb_Nigeria
    A security barrier marks the scene of a car bomb explosion at St. Theresa Catholic Church (background) at Madalla, Suleja, just outside Nigeria’s capital Abuja on Dec. 25, 2011. Islamist militant group Boko Haram said it planted bombs that exploded on Christmas Day at churches in Nigeria, one of which killed at least 27 people on the outskirts of the capital. Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde
  • Boko Haram attacks
    A woman walks past homes destroyed by the Islamist group Boko Haram in Bama, Borno State on Feb. 20, 2014. Reuters
  • Boko Haram Bomb_Nigeria
    A security barrier marks the scene of a car bomb explosion at St. Theresa Catholic Church (background) at Madalla, Suleja, just outside Nigeria’s capital Abuja on Dec. 25, 2011. Islamist militant group Boko Haram said it planted bombs that exploded on Christmas Day at churches in Nigeria, one of which killed at least 27 people on the outskirts of the capital. Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde
  • Boko Haram attacks
    A woman walks past homes destroyed by the Islamist group Boko Haram in Bama, Borno State on Feb. 20, 2014. Reuters

Just over a year ago, armed men on motorcycles entered a national park in Cameroon, near the Nigerian border, and swiftly abducted a family of vacationing French tourists — a husband and wife and their four children, along with their uncle.

Two months later, the kidnappers released the hostages along with 16 others in exchange for a cool $3.15 million. The transaction was made by French and Cameroonian negotiators, but it was not divulged who made the payments, according to Reuters.

So landed another cash infusion into the coffers of Boko Haram, the West African jihadist militia that has now gained worldwide infamy through the mass kidnapping of school girls in northern Nigeria. Long before its latest wave of attacks, the Islamist group has efficiently financed violent acts in the service of its mission to impose Shariah law through a combination of lucrative criminal enterprises, say experts who track the group. In addition to kidnappings, Boko Haram has secured financing through extortion, cooperation with international drug cartels and operating fake charities, these experts say.

“What is certain about Boko Haram is that the organization is very well funded; without an ever-increasing cash flow, the movement would have died out long ago,” reads a report from the Terrorism Research and Analysis Consortium, a research initiative of the reference publisher Beacham Group.

About a decade ago, shortly after Boko Haram was founded, it drew the majority of its funds from people in surrounding communities who supported its goal of imposing Islamic law while ridding Nigeria of Western influences, according to a report from the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) based at the University of Maryland. But that means of fundraising was inherently limited in a country in which 54 percent of people are classified as “extremely poor” by the World Bank.

In more recent times, Boko Haram has broadened its funding by drawing on foreign donors, and other ventures such as fake charity organizations, extortion, and deals with global drug cartels, according to the START report. Its most recent foray — the kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to sell on the black market as “wives” — is merely the outgrowth of a coherent strategy to find funds for expansion through whatever means necessary.

The term Boko Haram translates to “Western education is forbidden,” in the local Hausa language of the predominantly Muslim region in northern Nigeria where the group is based.

Since its formation in the early 2000s, the militia has been carrying out violent attacks around the country. Since 2009, when the group’s founding leader was killed and replaced by his second-in-command, the attacks have grown significantly more violent and intense, according to the START report. Last year, the U.S. State Department officially designated the group as a “foreign terrorist organization.”

“What Boko Haram achieved in less than a year is quite remarkable,” wrote David Doukhan of the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism, in a 2013 report, citing their reign over many parts of northeastern Nigeria, the institution of Sharia law, tax collection and an Islamic education system to recruit youth to their cause.

This expansion has required increasingly large sources of funding, which has apparently led Boko Haram to ratchet up its methods of raising money.

Boko Haram Targets Despite religious and political overtones, the majority of Boko Haram’s targets have been private citizens.  National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) / IBTimes

 

“Perhaps less sophisticated than other tactics, kidnapping has become one of the group’s primary funding sources,” wrote Jacob Zenn, African and Eurasian affairs analyst at The Jamestown Foundation, in a recent report.

But the group receives steady support from abroad, including from Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, according to the U.S. State Department, while using links to that terrorist group to secure further donations from sympathizers in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia, along with weapons and training.

An unnamed United States intelligence official last week told The Daily Beast that the Islamist group had received “strategic direction” from Osama bin Laden.

Boko Haram cloaks its sources of finance through the crafty use of a highly decentralized distribution network, say experts. The group employs an Islamic model of money transfer called “hawala,” based on an honor system and a global network of agents that leaves no trace.

“The very features which make hawala attractive to legitimate customers — efficiency, anonymity and lack of a paper trail — also make the system attractive for the transfer of illicit funds,” reads a report from the U.S. Treasury Department.

Other direct fundraising includes fake charities and nonprofits. Some have reported that the group receives regular payment from local leaders in northern Nigeria to protect their land.

An untraceable flow of money plus loosely guarded borders has created an ideal environment for black market trade. The porosity of Nigeria’s borders offers the group a steady flow of weapons, training, radicalization and funding.

A 2012 report from the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies alleges that Nigerian terrorist groups are financed by drug cartels in Latin America.

Lauretta Napoleoni, an Italian journalist and expert on terrorist finance, said this began to happen when the 2001 Patriot Act made it difficult to transfer drugs through the U.S. to Europe.

“Nobody wants to admit that cocaine reaches Europe via West Africa,” said Napoleoni. “This kind of business is a type of business where Islamic terrorist organizations are very much involved.”

Beyond drugs, Boko Haram has joined other criminal groups in Africa in the billion-dollar rhino and elephant poaching industry, according to a recent report from Born Free USA, a wildlife conservation organization.

“While impoverished locals are enlisted to pull the triggers, it is highly organized transnational crime syndicates and militias that run the poaching and reap the lion’s share of the profits, funding terrorism and increasingly war,” wrote New Scientist’s Richard Shiffman.

Using these extensive networks, Boko Haram members can smuggle anything from sugar and flour to weapons or even people across international borders. This, plus kidnapping ransoms and donations from abroad, is one of the most important factors keeping them in business.

Earlier this week, the U.S. State Department announced plans to further its efforts to counter Boko Haram, given the importance of Nigeria as an economic and political leader in Africa.

“The U.S. has a vital interest in helping to strengthen Nigeria’s democratic institutions, boost Nigeria’s prosperity and security, and ensure opportunity for all of its citizens,” according to a public statement.

A major part of their plan includes a counterterrorism finance program, that “aims to restrict Boko Haram’s ability to raise, move and store money.”

Editorial: CalPERS Proposal Would Authorize Pension Spiking by Another Name

http://www.sacbee.com/2014/08/19/6637585/editorial-calpers-proposal-would.html

Published: Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014 – 12:00 am

The California Public Employees’ Retirement System board needs to stop.

The board is preparing to approve rules today affecting employees who have been hired by local governments since 2013, after Gov. Jerry Brown pushed what he said was a pension reform intended to rein in the cost of pensions and end spiking for new employees.

The CalPERS staff cannot say whether the new regulations will increase costs or lower them. A staff report issued in April offered a vague analysis that there could be savings. We heard such comments in 1999 when the CalPERS staff declared the state could increase pensions at no cost to taxpayers. That didn’t work out well.

Our guess is that costs won’t be dropping. Most public employee unions are urging support or asking the board to go further. That’s their job. They’re supposed to work hard to get the most for their members. Elk Grove, Beverly Hills and many other cities are asking the board to reject the regulations.

The League of California Cities pointed out in a letter that CalPERS is preparing to impose “major pension rate increases” on local governments, and warned the proposal “could increase these already burdening costs unless supported by strict actuarial analysis and standards.”

The issue involves whether “pensionable compensation” is a job’s base pay for new employees, or normal monthly pay, which can include pay for one of nearly 100 bonuses that civil servants might receive.

Some seem reasonable. Most seem like they’re a basic part of the job. A newly hired cop might receive more monthly pay for being a detective or a canine officer. The question is whether the extra compensation should count toward pensions for employees hired after the new law took effect.

Being a detective might be worthy of more base pay and a larger pension. But the number of add-ons is surprisingly long. Officers could get more if they are physically fit or a good shot. Shouldn’t all cops be fit and shoot straight?

Officers could get higher pensions if they are assigned to Drug Abuse Resistance Education programs in schools, regularly enforce laws against drunken driving and drugs, find fugitives, fight gangs, direct traffic or work at the front desks at jails.

Newly hired firefighters would qualify for bigger pensions for inspecting buildings for fire-code compliance, investigating causes of fires or if they are “assigned to administrative work during normal hours of employment.

There could be a premium for being pilots, which sounds reasonable. There also are premiums for librarians whose job includes telling patrons where to find resources. We love librarians. But isn’t assisting patrons fundamental to what librarians do?

There could be premiums for employees “assigned to mix, transport and/or apply a tar-like substance for sidewalks, roads, roofs and/or parking lots”; who are “consistently assigned to finish cement work”; who operate audio-visual equipment; or who can take shorthand and dictation, and type quickly.

Brown sent a letter urging the board to reject a part of the proposal that would allow higher pay from temporary promotions to be counted toward pensions. That’s important, but a only a half-step.

With great fanfare, Brown and the Legislature approved a pension overhaul in 2012 that was supposed to reduce the cost of pensions for new employees.

By counting so many premiums, however, CalPERS would be stepping back from that commitment, and sanctioning spiking by another name.